top of page
Search
  • Writer's pictureLucian@going2paris.net

Pittsboro, Indiana To Prestonsburg, Kentucky


Walmart

Prestonburg, Kentucky

June 7, 2022


Long haul today. I had already seen the sights of Indiana and the Kentucky Louisville to Lexington rout. East of Lexington. past Winchester, I picked up the Kentucky Mountain Parkway headed to Prestonburg. My son’s name is Lucian Walter Preston Fox — hence the draw to Prestonburg. That route caused me to miss Frenchburg, Kentucky; I am including information about that town since I actually did mean to go there (you know, the Paris theme). Looks like I did not miss much.


I cannot tell if Prestonburg is in Appalachia. I’m tired so I’ll just say it — I’m not sure I’d fit in here .Which means I wouldn’t. As stated in the write up below:


About 26.3% of families and 27.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 44.2% of those under the age of 18 and 10.3% of those 65 and older.

I again broke with my guideline and drove interstates from Pittsboro to Lexington — no photos of that part of the drive. The Mountain Parkway is a pretty drive through the mountains..a couple of photos from that leg — typical quality for shooting through the windshield.





I laughed at this preface in the Wikipedia article: — Not to be confused with Prestonville, Kentucky or Preston, Kentucky.

Prestonsburg is a small home rule-class city in and the county seat of Floyd County, Kentucky, United States. It is in the eastern part of the state in the valley of the Big Sandy River. The population was 3,255 at the time of the 2010 census, down from 3,612 at the 2000 census.



History

The area was part of the 100,000-acre (400 km2) grant in the early 1700s to the family of John Preston's wife, born Elizabeth Patton, which he administered on her behalf. The grant was intended to permit British colonization beyond the Blue Ridge Mountains, but subsequent French and Indian resistance and a reversal of British policy limited its impact. The land was not settled until John Spurlock of Montgomery County, Virginia, arrived in 1791. He laid out the town of "Preston's Station" in 1797. It became the seat of Floyd County upon its formation in 1799 and was formally established in 1818. The post office was known as "Floyd Court House" from its establishment in 1816 until the late 1820s, when it was renamed "Prestonsburg".

On January 10, 1862, nearby Middle Creek was the scene of the largest battle of the Civil War to occur in eastern Kentucky. The town was also the site of one of the worst school bus disasters in American history on February 28, 1958. The town had a pack horse library in the late 1930s to bring library materials to rural mountain residents.




Culture U.S. Route 23, also called "The Country Music Highway" to celebrate the region's rich heritage of music, runs through Prestonsburg. Country music stars including Loretta Lynn, Crystal Gayle, Wynonna Judd, Naomi Judd, Billy Ray Cyrus, Tom T. Hall, Ricky Skaggs, Keith Whitley, Dwight Yoakam, and Patty Loveless are all from the Big Sandy Valley. Heavy metal singer and guitarist Dave Reffett also grew up near this area.

Prestonsburg is mentioned in Dwight Yoakam's "Readin', Rightin', Rt. 23" (from his album Hillbilly Deluxe), a song about the yearning of local coal miners to escape their plight by traveling up U.S. Route 23 to find employment in the factories in the North, not knowing that they were only trading one miserable life for another.

Prestonsburg is the location of the Mountain Arts Center, which hosts music concerts and is home to the Kentucky Opry. Middle Creek National Battlefield is the site of the largest and most significant Civil War battle in Eastern Kentucky.

Prestonsburg is home to the Samuel May House Living History Museum. It is the oldest known brick home remaining in the Big Sandy Valley. Built by Samuel May in 1817, the house was utilized by the Confederate forces as a recruiting station during the American Civil War. The 5th Kentucky Infantry CSA and 10th Kentucky Cavalry was organized at this location. The house was being used as a residence until 1981 and was donated to the City of Prestonsburg in 1992. The Samuel May House has since been restored and maintained as a living history museum.

The Jenny Wiley Theatre is located in Prestonsburg and offers theatrical productions all year long at both the outdoor Jenny Wiley Amphitheater, located within the Jenny Wiley State Resort Park, and the nearby Mountain Arts Center. The Theatre's presentations of classic Broadway musicals, comedies, historical dramas and holiday productions have kept theatre-goers entertained for the past 40 years. Prestonsburg is also the home of the East Kentucky Science Center. Opened in 2004, the Science Center contains one of the most technologically advanced planetariums in the United States. Demographics

As of the census of 2000, there were 3,612 people, 1,563 households, and 956 families residing in the city. The population density was 332.2 people per square mile (128.3/km2). There were 1,683 housing units at an average density of 154.8 per square mile (59.8/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 97.51% White, 0.33% African American, 0.50% Native American, 0.53% Asian, 0.44% from other races, and 0.69% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.02% of the population.

There were 1,563 households, out of which 26.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.4% were married couples living together, 14.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.8% were non-families. 37.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 17.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.09 and the average family size was 2.72.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 20.2% under the age of 18, 9.2% from 18 to 24, 26.1% from 25 to 44, 23.9% from 45 to 64, and 20.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females, there were 83.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 80.8 males. The median income for a household in the city was $20,810, and the median income for a family was $27,852. Males had a median income of $30,809 versus $22,439 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,013. About 26.3% of families and 27.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 44.2% of those under the age of 18 and 10.3% of those 65 and older.



For the town I missed:


Frenchburg, Kentucky

"Frenchburg" redirects here. For the community in West Virginia, see Frenchburg, West Virginia.

Frenchburg is a home rule-class city in Menifee County, Kentucky, in the United States. The population was 486 at the 2010 census. It is the seat and only incorporated city in its rural county. It is located at the junction of U.S. Route 460and Kentucky Route 36. Logging is the primary industry. History Frenchburg was laid out in 1869 to be the county seat of newly formed Menifee County and was named for Robert French, a local lawyer and judge. It was formally incorporated by the state assembly in 1871.

Frenchburg was nearly destroyed on June 27, 1882, when Beaver Creek flooded, sweeping away all but three buildings and killing six people.

In 1910 the United Presbyterian Center was established in Frenchburg as the only secondary education for Menifee County by Dr. Edward Owings Guerrant, a physician and preacher. A hospital was built in 1915 and served as the only one between Lexington and Ashland for many years. In 1978 the campus was admitted to the National Register for Historic Places as Frenchburg School Campus for its educational, social, and religious significance. Demographics As of the census of 2000, there were 551 people, 245 households, and 174 families residing in the city. The population density was 528.4 people per square mile (204.6/km2). There were 279 housing units at an average density of 267.5 per square mile (103.6/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 99.64% White, and 0.36% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latinoof any race were 1.09% of the population.

There were 245 households, out of which 32.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.6% were married couples living together, 19.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.6% were non-families. 26.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.25 and the average family size was 2.66.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 24.5% under the age of 18, 13.2% from 18 to 24, 22.9% from 25 to 44, 24.9% from 45 to 64, and 14.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 78.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 71.2 males. The median income for a household in the city was $22,350, and the median income for a family was $28,333. Males had a median income of $25,221 versus $19,286 for females. The per capita income for the city was $12,288. About 22.0% of families and 27.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 35.5% of those under age 18 and 24.2% of those age 65 or over.

4 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Comments


bottom of page